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NEC ECC: How to deal with multiple Compensation events all happening at once

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We have a project where several compensation events have been happening and the client is not prepared to deal with them quickly enough and they are all starting to pile up on top of each other.  To add the detail of each CE into the programme is getting confusing, but I want to show reality on where the programme completion date is going.

How do I best deal with a large number of CE's happening together all of which have time associated (several weeks each) ?  How do I get the client to start dealing with these under the contract?

If one very large CE is agreed do I just take that one and cover the other smaller concurrent CE delays that fall within the same time period.  Do I then keep going after the big hitters until I get to the final date I think the Completion Date is going to go out to?

Any feedback welcome.
asked Jul 31 in Compensation Events by Gordon Proudfoot (280 points)  

1 Answer

+1 vote
Gordon - my simple answer is that you add all the events progressively as you go demonstrating the progressive effect on planned Completion. Each period you should know exactly which event(s) have affected the planned Completion and make sure that is captured in the compensation event quotation. Cumulatively you can then keep track of why planned Completion has moved, and hopefully agree the movement in Completion Date as you go.  

I appreciate this approach is very simplistic and easy to say it is not as simple as that "in the real world", but this is the approach that has to be taken.
answered Jul 31 by Glenn Hide (66,480 points)